Annotary
Sort

Doodles astronómicos del año 2010

www.astrofisicayfisica.com
Rafael Barzanallana Rafael Barzanallana
10 hours ago
El primer doodle astronómico del año 2010 se publicó el 20 de abril para celebrar el 20 aniversario del Telescopio Espacial Hubble, que hoy en día, sigue en activo.
Cancel
Sort

Puzzling Galaxy Discovered --"Missing a Central Supermassive Black Hole"

www.dailygalaxy.com
Rafael Barzanallana Rafael Barzanallana
22 hours ago
The beautiful spiral galaxy visible in the center of the image is known as RX J1140.1+0307, a galaxy in the Virgo constellation imaged by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and it presents an interesting puzzle. At first glance, this galaxy appears to be a normal spiral galaxy, much like the Milky Way, but first appearances can be deceptive!
Cancel
Sort

Orion – the hunter

skywiseunlimited.com
After the Big Dipper, Orion is easily the most known and the most pointed out constellation by the people who recognize at least some of them. There is the obvious belt, although Orion lived BP (Before Pants) so he wears a short skirt, or kilt or such, and below that hangs his big, um sword. Maybe it’s just a dagger, or possibly it’s a sword, not that it matters.
Cancel
Sort

Surface Of The Sun

briankoberlein.com

This image might not look like much, but it’s actually an amazing step forward for solar astronomy. It captures the image of a large sunspot not in visible light, but in microwaves. 

The difference is important because different wavelengths of light are emitted by different layers of the Sun’s surface. The visible light we see everyday mostly originates from the photosphere, which is the lowest or deepest part of the Sun that we can directly observe. Microwaves are emitted by the chromosphere, which is the next layer above the photosphere. The chromosphere is much less dense than the photosphere, and has lots of interesting phenomena such as filaments and prominences, formed by a complex dance of thermodynamics, magnetic fields, and plasma. The chromosphere is also unusual because it’s actually hotter than the photosphere. You might expect the Sun is hottest at its interior, and the farther out you go, the cooler things become. That’s true for the photosphere, but not the chromosphere. The chromosphere is coolest near the photosphere with a temperature of about 4,000 K, but heats up as you move outward, reaching a temperature of 25,000 K. Just how the chromosphere gets so hot remains a bit of a mystery.

Cancel
Sort

La recién encontrada fuente de misteriosas explosiones cósmicas plantea enigmas más profundos

www.scientificamerican.com
Hasta hace 10 años, los radio-astrónomos pensaron que habían reunido una imagen esencialmente completa del cielo. En esta visión, con los telescopios en sintonía con las ondas de radio más que con la luz visible, las fuentes de radio más brillantes del sistema solar —el Sol y Júpiter— palidecerían ante el esplendor de la Vía Láctea. Radiante con emisiones de radio los escombros de las supernovas chisporroteantes, guarderías estelares envueltas en gas y los flashes metronómicos de los púlsares, nuestra galaxia dominaría la vista aérea. Más allá de eso, el cielo estaría moteado con puntos de luminosidad constantes y proveniente de los radio-eructos de agujeros negros supermasivos en los centros de galaxias distantes.
Cancel
Sort

Un nuevo tipo de mundo terrestre: los planetas granates | Astronomía | Eureka

danielmarin.naukas.com
De los más de 3500 planetas extrasolares descubiertos hasta la fecha apenas sabemos nada sobre ellos más allá de su órbita, su masa aproximada o su tamaño. Solo en unos pocos casos conocemos al mismo tiempo la masa y las dimensiones, un requisito necesario para determinar la densidad. Con este dato ya podemos comenzar comparar los exoplanetas con los planetas de nuestro sistema solar con el fin de encontrar las semejanzas y diferencias con respecto a los mundos ya conocidos. Y uno de los descubrimientos más importantes de estos últimos años es que planetas con la misma densidad pueden ser radicalmente distintos. ¿Por qué? Pues porque aquí entra en juego la composición química.
Cancel
Sort

Finally, An Explanation for the Alien Megastructure? - Universe Today

www.universetoday.com
Back in October of 2015, astronomers shook the world when they reported how the Kepler mission had noticed a strange and sudden drop in brightness coming from KIC 8462852 (aka. Tabby’s Star). This was followed by additional studies that showed how the star appeared to be consistently dimming over time. All of this led to a flurry of speculation, with possibilities ranging from large asteroids and a debris disc to an alien megastructure.
Cancel
Sort

25 años de planetas extrasolares

culturacientifica.com

Esta semana se han cumplido 25 años de la publicación en la revista Nature del artículo A planetary system around the millisecond pulsar PSR1257 + 12 (Un sistema planetario alrededor del púlsar de milisegundo PSR1257 + 12) por A. Wolszczan y D. A. Frail. En su resumen decía esto:

Los púlsares de radio de milisegundo, que son viejas (~109 años) estrellas de neutrones en rápida rotación aceleradas por acrecimiento de materia de sus compañeras estelares, se encuentran por lo general en sistemas binarios junto con otras estrellas degeneradas.

Cancel
Sort

Galileo y los satélites de Júpiter: el día que cambió la astronomía

www.astrofisicayfisica.com
Para Galileo las observaciones más importantes correspondieron a las realizadas sobre los satélites de Júpiter. Con un instrumento perfeccionado las observó la noche del 7 de enero de 1.610, fecha clave en la historia de la astronomía. Ya las había contemplado un mes antes con otras lentes, pero eran de tan mala calidad que no pudo percibir los satélites claramente.
Cancel
Sort

The Last Eclipse

briankoberlein.com
One thing 2017 has going for it is a total solar eclipse. Such eclipses are relatively common, but they often occur in hard to reach areas where not many people live. But the eclipse this Fall will wander across the central US, making it highly accessible. Such solar eclipses are only possible thanks to the favorable orbital geometries of the Sun, Moon and Earth, but its those same geometries that mean such total solar eclipses will eventually come to an end. 
Cancel
Sort

Pavo – the peacock

skywiseunlimited.com
There is a constellation way down in the southern part of the sky named Pavo which means Peacock, and its brightest star is named Peacock. Coincidence? Are there really any coincidences? Twenty four hours in a day, twenty four beers in a case. Okay that one maybe. Although those pesky Romans and the Egyptians both had a weird fascination with twelves, and twenty fours, and triangles, and toga parties, etc. So who knows? We probably have so many 12’s in our culture because of those guys.
Cancel
Sort

#Naukas16 Cuando Indiana Jones se hizo astrónomo | Conferencia | Cuaderno de Cultura Científica

culturacientifica.com
Ángel López Sánchez, astrofísico cordobés que trabaja en Australia, nos cuenta algunos resultados de su investigación de la mano de uno de sus personajes favoritos, Indiana Jones.
Cancel
Sort

Vera Rubin: 1928-2016

www.scientificamerican.com
El día de Navidad parece tener un significado especial en el mundo de la astronomía, no por estrellas sobre Belén, sino porque los grandes astrónomos parecen comenzar la vida o terminarla ese día. Isaac Newton nació, según el calendario juliano, el 25 de diciembre de 1642, y otra gigante de la astronomía, Vera Rubin, murió el día de Navidad de 2016, a los 88 años, después de una carrera en la que, luego de un sinfín de adversidades, cambió la forma en la que pensamos sobre el Universo.
Cancel
Sort

Pegasus – the winged horse

skywiseunlimited.com
One of the bigger autumn constellations is in the Perseus group, Pegasus. It’s just the front half of a horse, and the wings of course. These figures in the sky are not always the whole figure, sometimes it’s half. It’s good that they chose to use the front half of the horse because if they used the back half it might be confused with presidential politics.
Cancel
Sort

Cloudy, with a chance of supernova

mappingignorance.org
We live in a violent universe. The energy scales involved in many astrophysical processes are enough to stamp out our planet, not to talk about life as we know it. But, somehow, we have been living so far in a delicate equilibrium. Such equilibrium has been punctuated by relatively modest catastrophes that have possibly shaped our evolution; the Damocles’ sword is hanging over our heads and there is no much we can do about it, except keep an eye on the sky.
Cancel
Sort

Antimatter Astronomyx

briankoberlein.com
In astronomy we study distant galaxies by the light they emit. Just as the stars of a galaxy glow bright from the heat of their fusing cores, so too does much of the gas and dust at different wavelengths. The pattern of wavelengths we observe tells us much about a galaxy, because atoms and molecules emit specific patterns of light. Their optical fingerprint tells us the chemical composition of stars and galaxies, among other things. It’s generally thought that distant galaxies are made of matter, just like our own solar system, but recently it’s been demonstrated that anti-hydrogen emits the same type of light as regular hydrogen. In principle, a galaxy of antimatter would emit the same type of light as a similar galaxy of matter, so how do we know that a distant galaxy really is made of matter? 
Cancel
Sort

Winter Wonderland

briankoberlein.com
It’s winter in the northern hemisphere. That fact, combined with the arctic blast that’s reddening many cheeks in North America, means that many of us will enjoy a white Christmas. Since it’s a time to be thankful, here’s five reasons you should thank astrophysics for this year’s Winter wonderland. 
Cancel
Sort

Evidence Of Absence - One Universe at a Time

briankoberlein.com
Gamma rays are the most energetic forms of light in the Universe. They’re generated by a variety of sources, from the heated material surrounding supermassive black holes, to the supernova explosions of dying stars. But some have theorized they might also be produced by dark matter. 
Cancel
Sort

El año 2016 durará un segundo más

www.xatakaciencia.com

Un segundo extra se añadirá a los relojes de todo el mundo a las 23 horas, 59 minutos y 59 segundos Tiempo Universal Coordinado (UTC), es decir, que el año 2016 durará un segundo más.

Éste es un un procedimiento establecido desde la década de 1970 para mantener una relación entre el Tiempo Universal Coordinado (UTC) y una medida del ángulo de rotación de la Tierra en el espacio (UT1).

Cancel
Sort

Perseus – the hero

skywiseunlimited.com

The story behind the constellations of Perseus and those of his group is an ancient tale that is usually told from the perspective of the hero himself. It’s his patriarchal privilege.

There were two brothers, Acrisius and Proetus, who always quarreled with each other. Proetus became infatuated with his brother’s daughter, Danaë. The creepy uncle thing was bad enough but then Acrisius locked his daughter in a tower after hearing a prophecy that she would bear a son who would someday cause his death.

Cancel
Sort

We Three Kings

briankoberlein.com
Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, Saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him.
Cancel
Sort

¿Es la Tierra “prematura” desde una perspectiva cósmica?

www.cosmonoticias.org
El Universo tiene 13.800 millones de años de edad, mientras que nuestro planeta se formó hace solo 4.500 millones de años. Algunos científicos piensan que este espacio de tiempo significa que la vida en otros planetas podría ser miles de millones de años más antigua que la de la Tierra. No obstante, un nuevo trabajo teórico sugiere que la vida actualmente existente es en realidad “prematura” desde una perspectiva cósmica.
Cancel
Sort

Muere Vera Rubin, la mujer que encontró la materia oscura, sin llevarse su merecido Premio Nobel

es.gizmodo.com
Solo dos mujeres han ganado el Premio Nobel de Física desde 1901: Marie Curie y Maria Goeppert Mayer. Durante décadas ha habido otro nombre femenino en las quinielas: Vera Rubin. Pero la astrónoma, que hizo posible demostrar la existencia de la materia oscura, murió ayer sin su merecido reconocimiento.
Cancel
Sort

La mayor cartografía digital del universo visible

www.xatakaciencia.com
PanSTARRS, del Instituto de Astronomía de la Universidad de Hawaii, ha liberado los datos junto con el Instituto de Ciencia del Telescopio Espacial en Baltimore para crear la cartografía de miles de millones de estrellas y galaxias. Esta inmensa colección de información contiene dos petabytes de datos.
Cancel
Sort

Muere Vera Rubin, la eterna candidata al Nobel de Física

hipertextual.com
  • La científica Vera Rubin ha fallecido a la edad de 88 años.
  • La investigadora mereció el Premio Nobel de Física por encontrar evidencias de materia oscura, aunque nunca recibió el galardón.
  • Cancel
    Sort

    Vera, la espía de las estrellas

    mujeresconciencia.com
    Tan pronto como me interesé en la astronomía decidí que eso era lo que haría durante el resto de mi vida. Pero no sólo era la astronomía, era la maravilla de todo. Pensaba cómo se podía vivir en la tierra y no querer estudiar todas esas cosas. Al empezar todo parecía misterioso y quería descubrirlo, no entendía como podía estar rodeada de todas esas cosas sin conocerlas.
    Cancel
    Sort

    Llega el Astrónomo Indignado a imponer un poco de orden

    www.microsiervos.com
    Los medios no siempre dan con el tono adecuado a la hora de contar las noticias relacionadas con la ciencia, y la astronomía no es ninguna excepción. Es frecuente, por ejemplo, que las noticias sobre planetas extrasolares vayan acompañadas de imágenes que parecen salidas de cualquier película de Star Wars y que no se explique o al menos mencione que son impresiones artísticas y que en realidad no sabemos si el planeta en cuestión tiene atmósfera, agua líquida, algún tipo de vegetación, ni nada parecido.
    Cancel
    Sort

    Phoenix – the mythical bird

    skywiseunlimited.com
    Most constellations are a Latin word that translates to some generic thing. But a few are their own translation such as a specific person’s name. The Phoenix is a unique mythical bird that is pretty much only known as Phoenix, the bird that’s hard to get rid of. As we all learned in mythology class, or from Harry Potter, when the bird dies it burns in a flash to ash, and then the ash turns back into the bird and it starts all over squawking and flapping and pooping on a newspaper.
    Cancel
    Loading...