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Emotional Intelligence in our Schools:  Teaching Social, Emotional and Behavioral Skills

Emotional Intelligence in our Schools:  Teaching Social, Emotional and Behavioral Skills

www.drtepp.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago
Self-awareness--knowing your emotions, recognizing feelings as they occur, and discriminating between them, Mood management--handling feelings so they're relevant to the current situation and you respond in an appropriate manner,  Self-motivation--utilizing your emotions and directing yourself towards a goal, while controlling self-doubt, inertia, and impulsiveness, Empathy--recognizing feelings in others, tuning into their verbal and nonverbal cues, and being able to communicate this awareness, and Managing relationships--handling interpersonal interaction, and being able to utilize negotiation in the service of conflict resolution. 
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When Goleman’s book on EI first appeared, it was criticized by some in the scientific community for not providing any empirical support for his claims (Mayer & Cobb, 2000; Mayer, Salovey, & Caruso, 2004).  Critics also contended that Goleman’s definition of EI is overinclusive, incorporating aspects of cognition, personality, motivation, emotions, neurobiology, and intelligence (Locke, 2005; Matthews et al., 2002).  In fact,
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many equate his conceptualization of EI with almost any desirable trait that is not measured by traditional  intelligence tests
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Further, his conceptualization of EI has yet to show any true predictive ability when factors such as intelligence or personality are factored out.    Therefore, many feel that Goleman’s concept of EI does not actually define a unique and valid construct.
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Educational Policy on Emotional Intelligence

www.pacific.edu
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago
Educational policy on emotional intelligence appears to be based more on mass-media science journalism than on actual educational and psychological research.


... This is a great review and analysis.
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UNICEF: An overview of child well-being in rich countries

www.unicef.org
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago
The true measure of a nation’s standing is how well it attends to its children – their health and safety, their material security, their education and socialization, and their sense of being loved, valued, and included in the families and societies into which they are born.

In recent years, child poverty has risen in most rich countries. Norway is the only OECD country where child poverty can be described as very low and continuing to fall. Higher government spending on family and social benefits is associated with lower child poverty rates. No OECD country devoting 10% or more of GDP to social transfers has a child poverty rate higher than 10%. No country devoting less than 5% of GDP to social transfers has a child poverty rate of less than 15%. Variation in government policy appears to account for most of the variation in child poverty levels between OECD countries. There appears to be little relationship between levels of employment and levels of child poverty. It is the distribution of employment among different kinds of household, the proportion of those in work who are on low-pay, and the level of state benefits for the unemployed and the low-paid, that contribute most to differences in child poverty rates between countries. Variations between countries in the proportion of children growing up in lone-parent families do not explain national poverty rates. Sweden, for example, has a higher proportion of its children living in lone parent families than the United States or the United Kingdom but a much lower child poverty rate than either. There is considerable variation in child poverty rates even in countries with broadly similar levels of government spending. A realistic target for all OECD countries would be to bring relative child poverty rates below 10%. For the countries that have already achieved this, the next aim might be to emulate the four Nordic countries in bringing child poverty rates below 5%. In many OECD countries there is a pronounced trend towards lower relative earnings for the lowest paid. There is a trend for any increase in social spending in OECD countries to be allocated principally to pensions and health care, leaving little for further investment in children.
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Emotional Intelligence: What Does the Research Really Indicate?

alliance.la.asu.edu
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago
In her critique of emotional intelligence (EI) theory and research, Waterhouse (2006) makes
several claims. First, she argues that there are “many conflicting constructs of EI,” implying
that it cannot be a valid concept given this multiplicity of views. Second, she cites some research and opinion suggesting that “EI has not been differentiated from personality plusIQ.”
Third,she statesthat “the claim thatEI determinesreal-world success has not been validated.”
Finally,she proposesthatresearch on brain function provesthat there cannot be a “unitaryEI.”
Basedonthis critique,she arguesthatEI competenciesshouldnotbe taughtinthe schools.This
article addresses eachofthese criticisms andshowsthattherenowismuchmore empiricalsupportfor EItheory than Waterhouse suggested in her article.
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Raise a Resilient Child

Raise a Resilient Child

www.ahaparenting.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago
hildren who are by nature more adaptable, more outgoing, and more emotionally even keeled have a head-start in developing resilience.  We have even identified specific genes that seem to confer some degree of resilience, such as 5HTT, which influences serotonin, and OPRM1, which promotes attachment.
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Democratic schools and social, emotional intelligence

Democratic schools and social, emotional intelligence

smartblogs.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago

Here are six things they can do.

  1. Pay more attention to the social context of schooling and less on the summative. We have reams of research to corroborate the absolute importance of relationships.
  2. Scaffold opportunities to be exposed to and experience direct contact with the world.
  3. Use art experiences to engage and activate social action projects.
  4. Become deliberate and articulate in naming the attributes and skills of social and emotional intelligence.
  5. Be thoughtful. Mirror mindfulness and reflection in one’s daily interactions. Have moments of silence during school days.
  6. Network with other schools involved in social and emotional learning projects.
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A Parent Primer on Social and Emotional Learning

A Parent Primer on Social and Emotional Learning

www.edutopia.org
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago
The change is reflected in the numbers: Educators in the district credit CARE for Kids for reducing behavior problems by 50 percent and raising academic performance at the first schools to adopt it.
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The Importance of Boosting Emotional Intelligence and Teaching Empathy to Kids

The Importance of Boosting Emotional Intelligence and Teaching Empathy to Kids

childparenting.about.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago
Make sure your child's own emotional needs are met.
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Teach your child how to cope with negative emotions.
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Ask, "How would you feel?
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Name that feeling.
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alk about positive and negative behaviors around
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Set a good example.
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Emotion regulation in early childhood

www.childcarequarterly.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago
Emotion regulation describes an individual’s ability to respond to environmental stimuli with a range of emotions in a controlled manner (Panfile and Laible 2012). In other words, emotion regulation is the ability to gauge the appropriate level and range of emotional response to a given situation.
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Teachers play a significant role in helping young children refine and control their emotional responses to situations (Panfile and Laible 2012). Teachers serve as role models that affect preschool children’s behaviors and the degree to which they express their emotions.

Social learning theory can help us understand the significance of teachers. Adults serve as both models and reinforcers—a skilled teacher influences children’s motivation to behave in a developmentally appropriate, socially acceptable manner. Children watch and they imitate

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The integration of free play in the early childhood classroom is key to children’s increased ability to regulate their emotions (Hoffmann and Russ 2011). Play fosters social interactions and emotional development
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Creativity, emotional intelligence, and school performance in children

www.sciencedirect.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago
The relationships between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and academic performance have been explored in many studies, and the main results depend on the theoretical EI perspective (i.e., trait versus ability). Indeed, research devoted to EI has split off into two distinct perspectives. Both perspectives share the idea that cognitive abilities are not the unique predictor of successful adaptation but that emotional competencies have to be taken into consideration.
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elf-control, well-being, emotional sensibility and sociability
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On the one hand, ability models (Mayer & Salovey, 1997) conceive EI as an ability encompassing four dimensions: (a) emotions identification; (b) emotions utilization; (c) emotions understanding and (d) emotions regulation.
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The main results of studies investigating the link between trait EI and academic performance indicate that despite the weak correlation between intelligence and trait EI, it could act as a moderator factor between intelligence and academic performance (Chamorro-Premuzic & Furnham, 2006) rather than having a direct effect. Indeed, Petrides, Frederickson, and Furnham (2004) found that trait EI induce higher academic performance only within a group a low-IQ pupils, and several studies reported no significant association between trait EI and academic performance
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In sum, creativity and EI (albeit more controversially) are related to academic performance. However, no study has assessed the comparative predictive effect of creativity and EI among a sample of children.
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