Annotary
Sort
PBS LearningMedia

PBS LearningMedia

www.pbslearningmedia.org
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
5 months ago
Resource of learning media by grade level, subjects, standards, and collections
Sort
MoMA | MoMA Learning

MoMA | MoMA Learning

www.moma.org
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
5 months ago
Art History Resources for the Classroom
Sort
Bill Hammack's Video & Audio on Engineering

Bill Hammack's Video & Audio on Engineering

www.engineerguy.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
5 months ago
Engineering videos about stuff you want to know about
Sort
Connexions - Sharing Knowledge and Building Communities

Connexions - Sharing Knowledge and Building Communities

cnx.org
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
5 months ago
place to view and share educational material made of small knowledge chunks called modules that can be organized as courses, books, reports, etc.
Sort

No Child Left Untableted

www.nytimes.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago
The tablets, paid for in part by a $30 million grant from the federal Department of Education’s Race to the Top program, were created and sold by a company called Amplify, a New York-based division of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation, and they struck me as exemplifying several dubious American habits now ascendant: the overvaluing of technology and the undervaluing of people; the displacement of face-to-face interaction by virtual connection; the recasting of citizenship and inner life as a commodified data profile; the tendency to turn to the market to address social problems.
Cancel
Sort

Guesses and Hype Give Way to Data in Study of Education

www.nytimes.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago
he choice of instructional materials — textbooks, curriculum guides, homework, quizzes — can affect achievement as profoundly as teachers themselves; a poor choice of materials is at least as bad as a terrible teacher, and a good choice can help offset a bad teacher’s deficiencies.
Cancel
Most programs that had been sold as effective had no good evidence behind them. And when rigorous studies were done, as many as 90 percent of programs that seemed promising in small, unscientific studies had no effect on achievement or actually made achievement scores worse.
Cancel
Show all 2 highlights
Sort

With Common Core, Fewer Topics but Covered More Rigorously

www.nytimes.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
7 months ago

Ms. Baldi, who taught second grade for the previous four years at P.S. 169 and will teach kindergarten this year, said she had changed how she taught math. In the past, she said she used to present a math topic first before giving exercises for her students to solve. Taking heed of the Common Core’s instruction that “mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution,” Ms. Baldi began to give a new problem “cold turkey,” without introduction or explanation, and let groups of students try to figure it out.

“I’m more of a facilitator, and I’m taking more of a step back,” she said.

Only after the students brainstormed their own solutions would she discuss the different ways of solving it. “I thought that they got a better understanding, because they got to tackle the problem on their own and got to hear from the other students,” she said.

Cancel
Sort
Changing the face of education

Changing the face of education

www.maclife.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
8 months ago
What springs to mind when you hear the phrase “technology in education?” Is it an outdated Windows computer collecting dust in the back corner of a classroom? Software that’s nothing more than overly animated flashcards? Or is it the iPad, which supports interactive textbooks and dynamic educational apps for all ages?
Cancel
3 percent of the student body reported that they felt more interested in school when they used an iPad, and 86 percent said that it was easier to gather information.
Cancel
“There’s enough existent research that shows well-integrated technology has a positive impact on student learning outcomes,” says Pratt. “We weren’t as concerned about proving that the iPad is just like every other computer so much as getting it out there to everybody all at the same time so teachers could start taking advantage of it in their lessons.”
Cancel
But that doesn’t mean Willcott hasn’t faced some challenges in bringing the iPad into her curriculum. For one, she’s had to completely adjust the way she teaches. “I was, and still am, concerned about finding sufficient time and knowledge to fully implement use of the iPad in the classroom.” Willcott adds that when they’re not using the iPad, she has to make sure that students stay on task during lecture hour. “It is certainly another item for teachers to manage in the classroom.” Willcott continues that the frequency of students being off task usually decreases once the novelty of the device wears off.
Cancel
Julie Willcott, who teaches chemistry, physics, biology, and forensics, uses a variety of apps to teach her students new concepts, and to measure their engagement. “I use the eClicker app in all my classes,” she says. “It allows me to poll the audience by asking prepared questions. I get a sense of what the students do and do not understand, and I can then adjust my teaching to address misconceptions.” Willcott also uses apps like iBrainstorm to help students organize their notes, and SimplePhysics and Santa’s Engineer to teach students how to design based on physics principles.
Cancel
However, Pratt makes the case that it’s more cost efficient in the long run to invest in applications for the iPad rather than buying textbooks every few years. “I think $15 [for a textbook] is a good starting point, especially in our model where students are managing their own devices. We have to think about how many uses we get out of a traditional textbook, divide that cost by a number of uses, and [compare how] that would equate to the digital cost.” Most schools get 10 cycles out of $100 textbooks, so $15 for a yearly digital copy would be a bit pricier, but the trade-off could be worth it in the long run. “You could argue that the ability to own that resource, take notes, and add multimedia is worth the extra cost per student use,” he adds. With every student having immediate access to the internet, Pratt posits that it may be the end of an era. “I don’t know that we need textbooks from traditional publishers now as we did in the past.”
Cancel
Show all 6 highlights
Sort

Why is Blended Learning Important?

en.wikibooks.org
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
8 months ago
Differentiated instruction involves “custom-designing instruction based on student needs.” (deGula, 2004) In differentiated instruction, educators look at students’ learning styles, interests, and abilities. Once these factors have been determined, educators decide which curriculum content, learning activities, products, and learning environments will best serve those individual students’ needs. Blended learning can fit into a number of these areas. By using blended learning, educators are definitely altering the learning environment when students work collaboratively in learning communities online, for example. Teachers could also add relevant curriculum content that would be unavailable or difficult to comprehend outside of the internet. Learning activities and products can also be changed to use technologies in a classroom that uses blended learning.
Cancel

Another advantage of blended learning is pacing and attendance. In most blended learning classrooms, there is the ability to study whenever the student chooses to do so. If a student is absent, she/he may view some of the missed materials at the same time that the rest of the class does, even though the student cannot be physically in the classroom. This helps students stay on track and not fall behind, which is especially helpful for students with prolonged sicknesses or injuries that prevent them from attending school. These “self-study modules” also allow learners to review certain content at any time for help in understanding a concept or to work ahead for those students who learn at a faster pace. (Alvarez, 2005)

Because of the ability of students to self-pace, there is a higher completion rate for students in blended learning classrooms than to those in strictly e-learning situations. (Flavin, 2001) This self-pacing allows for the engagement of every learner in the classroom at any given time. Students also see that the learning involved becomes a process, not individual learning events. This revelation allows for an increased application of the learning done in the classroom. (Flavin, 2001)

Cancel
Show all 2 highlights
Sort

IT Spending Per Student

www.apqceducation.org
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
8 months ago
Student achievement does not appear to be correlated with IT spending. In a recent study, the top performers in terms of student achievement spent less on IT per student than the median.
Sort
Why iPads Aren't Ready For Classrooms... Yet

Why iPads Aren't Ready For Classrooms... Yet

gizmodo.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
8 months ago
But the iPad's still not ready yet for schools.
Cancel
It's too expensive, there's not enough education-focused content, it's terrible at productivity, it's distracting. Sure, there are certainly ways in which the iPad really can be a competent learning accessory.
Cancel
And staring at that LCD screen all day? Uncomfortable at best. For developing eyes, maybe worse.
Cancel
Show all 3 highlights
Sort

More Schools Embrace the iPad as a Learning Tool

www.nytimes.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
8 months ago
Educators, for instance, are still divided over whether initiatives to give every student a laptop have made a difference academically.
Cancel
“There is very little evidence that kids learn more, faster or better by using these machines,” said Larry Cuban, a professor emeritus of education at Stanford University, who believes that the money would be better spent to recruit, train and retain teachers. “IPads are marvelous tools to engage kids, but then the novelty wears off and you get into hard-core issues of teaching and learning.”
Cancel
“I think this could very well be the biggest thing to hit school technology since the overhead projector,” Mr. Wolfe said.
Cancel
But technology advocates like Elliot Soloway, an engineering professor at the University of Michigan, and Cathie Norris, a technology professor at the University of North Texas, question whether school officials have become so enamored with iPads that they have overlooked less costly options, like smartphones that offer similar benefits at a fraction of the iPad’s base cost of about $500.
Cancel
Indeed, many of the districts are paying for their iPads through federal and other grants, including money from the federal Race to the Top competitive grant program, which administrators in Durham, N.C., are using to provide an iPad to every teacher and student at two low-performing schools.
Cancel
“You can do everything that the iPad can with existing off-the-shelf technology and hardware for probably $300 to $400 less per device,” Professor Soloway said.
Cancel

Apple has sold more than 7.5 million iPads since April, the company reported, but it is not known how many went to schools.

The company has been developing a school market for the iPad by working with textbook publishers on instructional programs and sponsoring iPad workshops for administrators and teachers. It does not, however, appear to have marketed the tablet as aggressively to schools as it did its early desktop computers, some of which were heavily discounted for schools and helped establish a generation of Apple users. School officials say that Apple has been offering only a standard educational discount of about 10 percent on the iPad.

Cancel
About 5,400 educational applications are available specifically for the iPad, of which nearly 1,000 can be downloaded free.
Cancel
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, which developed the iPad algebra program in California, said it planned to compare the test scores of students using a textbook in digital and traditional book formats. The iPad version offers video of the author solving equations, and individualized assessments and practice problems.
Cancel
Show all 9 highlights
Sort
The Dos and Don'ts for Integrating iPads

The Dos and Don'ts for Integrating iPads

www.edutopia.org
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
8 months ago
the teachers did not trust the students, and that they did not have the skills or appropriate apps for the students to be productive with the iPads.
Cancel
Sort
California Embraces Open Source Digital Textbooks

California Embraces Open Source Digital Textbooks

www.edutopia.org
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
8 months ago
here's been a sense for a long time that the system we have for textbooks hasn't been working," Levin says. "We're seeing now there may be a way to fix it. It's less a question of whether we go there but how we go there."
Cancel
Unlike their hard-copy cousins, digital textbooks can be quickly updated with recent discoveries and current events. California adopts new books every six years. (Some classroom textbooks still describe Pluto as a planet.) In contrast, the state-reviewed PDFs will be updated after two years.
Cancel

In the meantime, teachers looking for more rapidly updated information can head to the sites of digital textbook providers like Palo Alto–based nonprofit CK-12 Foundation (4) or Curriki (5), based in Washington, DC, to acquire the newest version or even remix a digital textbook of their own. On these open-source sites, materials created and reviewed by educators are shared under a Creative Commons license, which means other teachers may use and adapt the content for free.

On CK-12 (6), after doing a keyword search to find books or chapters on a certain topic, teachers can combine their chosen items into a single document called a FlexBook that can be printed out or saved as a PDF and used in class as teaching material. The site also provides a Microsoft Word-like text editor that allows teachers to customize material.

Curriki (7) hosts a greater variety of resources, including worksheets, games, and lesson plans. Teachers group their favorites as online "collections" that they can invite other teachers to share, discuss, or add to -- much like an iTunes playlist. Materials can also be printed or downloaded, and teachers who want to contribute their own materials can do so by using simple online templates. On sites like these, teachers can peer-review information for accuracy.

Cancel
Show all 3 highlights
Sort
Goodbye Textbooks, Hello iPad

Goodbye Textbooks, Hello iPad

technologizer.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
8 months ago
“Motor skills are not necessary. Three year olds are using them and instantly figured out how to swipe from left to right,” Lowton said. “The home button gets you out of anything.”
Cancel
The iPad may also pose challenges for school IT administrators, and some are having difficulty pairing the iPad with schools’ existing technology investments/ iPad adoption is most difficult for schools that have standardized on the PC. File sharing, syncing, and printing are some of the primary issues, and not all schools have Wi-Fi.
Cancel
Show all 2 highlights
Sort
Anticipating a Blended Classroom Boom Led by Education Startups

Anticipating a Blended Classroom Boom Led by Education Startups

techcrunch.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
8 months ago
Rather than create one-off math or reading apps, ”middleware” companies for education are trying to help schools systemically implement blended techniques.
Cancel
Sort

Rocketship Education’s next phase: technology in a blended classroom | EdSource Today

www.edsource.org
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
8 months ago

Palo Alto-based Rocketship Education has attracted national attention in the past few years for its innovative use of technology and impressive test scores for its largely low-income, Hispanic students.

Now, as other districts and charter schools are starting to emulate the Rocketship model, which relies on computer-guided instruction as a key component, the K-5 charter school organization is considering leaving it behind, like a first-stage booster, and moving toward a different a 21st century classroom. Instead of rotating students into a “learning lab” – a large computer room – for about quarter of the day as it does now, several of Rocketship’s seven San Jose schools are experimenting with turning their learning lab into one large, all-day classroom incorporating both technology and three teachers and non-credentialed teaching assistants. Over the course of the day, between 100 and 120 students move from individual computer-based instruction to small-group lessons to a large-group setting, moving on cue with amoeba-like fluidity from one activity to another – at least when it’s working smoothly.

Cancel
But elementary school students, with shorter attention spans  and less focus, pose distinct challenges in an open classroom, which is why Rocketship is cautious about trying the model in earlier grades.
Cancel
The learning lab also was a financially shrewd model for cash-strapped California schools, which have seen their basic funding cut by nearly a quarter over the past five years. Rotating students from four classes per grade into the lab, operated by lower paid, non-credentialed tutors and staff, eliminated the expense of one teacher per grade or about $500,000 per school, which Rocketship has used to increase teachers’ pay, underwrite construction of additional schools and – this is key – to hire an assistant principal charged with teacher training at every school. At a time when most districts were cutting back mentor teaching positions and administrators, Rocketship offered extensive guidance to first- and second-year teachers from Teach for America, who comprise  about half of the teaching staff.
Cancel
feedback from middle school is that kids were good in class but less likely to work independently
Cancel
“The freedom to design a schedule to fit needs of kids is great experience for me as a professional,” she said. Students are getting “a ton more small group attention than previously,” because, working as a team, the three teachers and a full-time teaching assistant can maximize the larger groups and target the smaller clusters of students for a literature discussion or tutorial on fractions.
Cancel
keeping students on task with a lot happening around them, can be daunting for an inexperienced teacher.
Cancel
Show all 6 highlights
Sort
The Nuts & Bolts of an iPad Classroom

The Nuts & Bolts of an iPad Classroom

kathycassidy.com
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
8 months ago
Truthfully, the management has turned out to be more work than I imagined. Setting up email on each device (gmail worked the best), syncing apps, updates to firmware, making (and re-making) folders and keeping the devices charged has kept me busy. My IT department has been supportive, but they are clear that this is my job and not theirs.
Cancel
Sort
Before We Flip Classrooms, Let's Rethink What We're Flipping To

Before We Flip Classrooms, Let's Rethink What We're Flipping To

www.edutopia.org
Paige Leavitt Paige Leavitt
8 months ago
isn't it time to make use of new technology to move beyond streaming impersonal frontal teaching, instructional video tutorials or filmed lectures aimed at mass audiences?
Cancel
It asks: Do we focus on using technology for perfecting the art of instruction (Instructionism (23)) or rather for achieving active learning-by-doing in social contexts (Constructionism (24))?
Cancel
Show all 2 highlights
Loading...